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Tucker, Johnson, Holley & DeAngelo Legislation to Facilitate Relocation for Military Families Clears General Assembly

Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Cleopatra Tucker, Gordon Johnson, Jamel Holley and Wayne DeAngelo to help provide military families with more flexibility regarding the use of their housing allowance when they receive orders to relocate gained the approval of the General Assembly on Thursday.

“Oftentimes service in the military requires members to relocate with little or no prior notice, which puts a great deal of stress on military families,” said Tucker (D-Essex). “By minimizing disruption to the lives of service members’ spouses and children, this legislation will ensure that members can balance their commitments to both the military and their families.”

The resolution (AR-134) would urge the president and Congress to enact the “Military Family Stability Act,” federal legislation that would allow military family members to move to a new location either six months before or after a service member’s permanent change of station report date. The sponsors noted that the measure would provide military spouses with more time to adjust career plans, if needed, and would limit the chances of a child having to transition to a new school in the middle of an academic year.

The federal bill would allow military family members to receive, for up to six months, a housing allowance based on their current location while the service member would receive housing compensation or be provided with temporary unaccompanied housing at the new location.

Military family members would be eligible for the housing allowance if:

  • the spouse is employed or enrolled in a degree, certificate or license program;
  • the service member and spouse have at least one child in school;
  • the spouse or child is covered under the Exceptional Family Member Program;
  • the service member or spouse is caring for an immediate family member with a chronic or long-term illness; or
  • the service member is undergoing a permanent change of station as an individual augmentee or other deployment arrangement.

“We all recognize the difficulties that members of our armed forces face, but we would be remiss to overlook the challenges their spouses and children also deal with,” said Johnson (D-Bergen). “Abrupt and frequent relocations can affect family members’ ability to hold down a job or finish school. Our state and our nation must take an active role in making these transitions easier for military families.”

“Giving military families more time to plan a move can help ensure that they can make the appropriate arrangements for school-age children or loved ones who may need special medical care, for example,” said Holley (D-Union). “This legislation is about providing some flexibility for the men and women who put their lives on the line for the sake of our nation.”

“The men and women who serve in America’s military love their families and their country above all else,” said DeAngelo (D-Mercer/Middlesex). “When they know that their loved ones are taken care of, they’re better able to devote themselves to military service. As such, this is, fundamentally, a means of advancing national security, which benefits all Americans.”

The legislation gained unanimous approval.

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Assembly Approves Gusciora, Eustace, Holley & Muoio Bill to Encourage Redevelopment of Long-Dormant, Historic Taverns

Bill Aims to Preserve & Revive Historic Watering Holes like Eagle Tavern in Trenton

By a vote of 64-5-3, the full Assembly on Thursday approved legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Reed Gusciora, Tim Eustace, Jamel Holley and Elizabeth Maher Muoio allowing municipalities to issue retail liquor licenses to qualified buyers looking to redevelop historic taverns into 21st century drinking and eating establishments.

Gusciora introduced the bill in hopes of facilitating redevelopment of the abandoned Eagle Tavern on South Broad Street in Trenton, which has sat vacant for decades after several failed attempts to operate the building as a restaurant. Built as a private home in 1765, it was enlarged for use as a tavern in the early nineteenth century and was frequented by patrons of the nearby Eagle raceway. It served as the political center for the city’s South Ward, and was a meeting place of the Masons.

“One of Trenton’s biggest strengths is its history,” said Gusciora (D-Mercer/Hunterdon). “The Eagle Tavern is one of the city’s oldest buildings and served as a popular place for residents to socialize and for politicians to meet. Unfortunately, no developer is willing to undertake the costs associated with the property’s redevelopment because of liquor license limitations in the city. This could help bring back a building that is historically important to our city and our state, provide the city with much needed revenue and further the momentum slowly brewing on South Broad Street.”

The bill (A-2069) would allow a municipality to issue a retail liquor license to sell alcoholic beverages for on-premise consumption to the highest qualified bidder of an abandoned historic tavern.

“These buildings functioned as taverns at some point. It would be great to see them come alive as social gathering places again,” said Eustace (D-Bergen/Passaic). “Instead of letting them languish in blight, this bill can help renew interest in these properties from developers, which could provide revenue for municipalities and provide residents with an outing option uniquely steeped in history.”

The bill defines a historic tavern as a building built before 1920 that is included in the New Jersey Register of Historic Places and the National Register of Historic Places, and where the sale and service of alcoholic beverages for on-premise consumption was the primary business prior to 1920. The provisions of the bill would apply to taverns that were in operation prior to the ratification of the 18th Amendment to the United States Constitution, which commenced the country’s Prohibition era.

“When it comes to redeveloping these old, historic properties, sometimes it’s easier said than done. In some cases the cost of a liquor license may be far too prohibitive and, in other cases, there simply may not be any more available licenses,” said Holley (D-Union). “This bill would cut through all that while helping to preserve history, boost local tax bases and revitalize neighborhoods.”

“Given New Jersey’s colonial roots, many towns, like Trenton, have historic taverns that have unfortunately sat dormant for years because of a lack of available liquor licenses,” said Muoio (D-Mercer/Hunterdon). “This bill would incentivize redevelopers to preserve history while turning these abandoned properties back into productive, tax-generating real estate again.”

The bill prohibits the holder of the retail license from transferring the license for use in connection with another premises. A license issued under this bill is not subject to the population limitations that restrict a municipality from issuing more than one plenary retail consumption license for each 3,000 people residing in that municipality.

The bill now heads to the Senate for consideration.

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McKeon, Jasey, Eustace & Holley Bill to Study the Condition of NJ Drinking Water Infrastructure Advances in Legislature

(TRENTON) – Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats John McKeon, Mila Jasey, Tim Eustace and Jamel Holley to create a task force to review the state’s drinking water sources was cleared the Assembly, 64-0, on Thursday.

The sponsors note the water crisis in Flint, Michigan has raised concerns across the country about the water filtration process and the risk of contaminates in the water system, especially lead.

“The situation in Flint Michigan should be a lesson to us all to ensure protection of our water supply,” said McKeon (D-Essex, Morris). “This should be a priority for New Jersey as well. A task force can help us identify the areas in need of strengthening in regards to the state’s water supply.

“This is critically important to New Jersey’s families,” said Jasey (D-Essex, Morris). “A task force will allow us to assess the current infrastructure and understand what needs to be done to ensure protection of our water supply.”

“Just like roads and railways, our water infrastructure needs to be assessed, repaired or updated,” said Eustace (D-Bergen, Passaic). “The task force will first learn the extent of what needs to be done and then inform us of where we must begin to correct the ailing system. This panel will be an essential part of the process to protect New Jersey’s water infrastructure.”

“An aging water infrastructure means New Jersey’s communities will become more and more vulnerable to flooding, contamination or even loss of power during severe storms,” said Holley (D-Union). “We need to know the good and bad pertaining to the state’s water system before we can take the necessary steps to repair it. This legislation helps us do that.”

In the legislation, the sponsors also note that New Jersey has history of being proactive in this area and has enacted numerous statutes aimed at protecting the state’s water supply. However, an aging infrastructure and the deterioration of the physical assets of water supply systems present serious risks to the integrity of drinking water and to the environment.

The concurrent resolution (ACR-161) establishes the “Joint Legislative Task Force on Drinking Water Infrastructure” to study and make recommendations concerning issues related to drinking water infrastructure in New Jersey. The task force is charged with identifying both short-term and long-term solutions and making recommendations to address the quality and condition of drinking water infrastructure in the state.

In conducting its business, the task force is directed to call upon the Department of Environmental Protection, the New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Trust, the Division of Water in the Board of Public Utilities and representatives of investor-owned and government-owned water utilities to offer their respective expertise and experience concerning the condition of the state’s drinking water infrastructure, and what improvements are necessary to ensure a safe drinking water supply.

The task force is to be composed of six members: three members of the Senate appointed by the Senate President, and three members of the General Assembly appointed by the Speaker.

Within six months after the date the task force organizes, it is directed to prepare and submit a report containing its findings and recommendations, including any proposals for legislation and other appropriate legislative or regulatory action.

The concurrent resolution was approved by the Assembly Environment and Solid Waste Committee on May 3 and now awaits further consideration in the Senate.

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Assembly Democratic Bill to Expand Primary Voting Rights, Encourage Youth Participation in Elections Clears Assembly

Legislation Would Allow Certain 17-Year-Olds to Vote in Primaries

Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Andrew Zwicker, Jamel Holley, Elizabeth Muoio, Tim Eustace, Arthur Barclay, Angela McKnight and Raj Mukherji that would allow more young New Jersey residents to participate in elections gained Assembly approval on Thursday.

The bill (A-3591), the “New Voter Empowerment Act,” would allow 17-year-olds to vote in a primary election provided they will turn 18 on or before the next succeeding general election.

“Young people in New Jersey are eager to raise their voices and make a difference,” said Zwicker (D-Hunterdon/Mercer/Middlesex/Somerset). “More than 23,000 of them will have a birthday after the primary but before the general election. Under my legislation, they would be able to vote in both elections. It’s an important step forward to fully empower thousands of new voters every year.”

New Jersey would join 21 states and the District of Columbia in allowing 17-year-olds who will turn 18 during the interim period between a primary or caucus and the general election to participate in the nomination process, Zwicker noted.

“There’s a whole set of young people in New Jersey who want to – and should – fulfill their civic duty during the general election but are shut out of making their voices heard during the primary,” said Holley (D-Union). “Allowing 17-year-old New Jersey residents who ultimately will choose a candidate in the general election to vote in the primary will make the electoral process more fair.”

“Many states permit eligible 17-year-olds to vote, because they recognize that making voters choose a candidate they had no say in nominating is fundamentally undemocratic,” said Muoio (D-Mercer/Hunterdon). “All who can vote in a general election should be afforded the opportunity to engage in the primary, too.”

“As a matter of principle, all eligible voters should be able to take part in both the primary and the general election,” said Eustace (D-Bergen/Passaic). “This legislation will make that basic notion the law in New Jersey.”

“Those who turn 18 in between a primary and a general election are expected to participate in one part of the democratic process but are excluded from another very important part entirely,” said Barclay (D-Camden/Gloucester). “New Jersey must ensure that these young voters have a say in both June and November.”

“It’s important for our state to establish a culture of voting in both primaries and general elections among young people,” said McKnight (D-Hudson). “Making this simple change will enable thousands more first-time voters to get involved in elections.”

“Increasing voter turnout is integral to ensuring that all voices are heard and all people are represented in our democracy,” said Mukherji (D-Hudson). “If 17-year-olds are allowed to enlist and serve in the Armed Forces with parental consent or upon emancipation, then they should certainly be allowed to participate in selecting party nominees when they will turn 18 in time to vote for that nominee.”

The legislation was approved 57-17.

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Lesniak, Quijano & Holley Honor Elizabeth High School Boys’ Varsity Soccer Team for Outstanding Achievement

North II Group IV State Champions Finished Season With 18-4 Record

Union County legislators Senator Raymond Lesniak, Assemblywoman Annette Quijano and Assemblyman Jamel Holley recognized the Elizabeth High School boys’ varsity soccer team Thursday on the Assembly floor for its outstanding performance during the previous season.

Having finished the season with 18 wins and four losses, the team captured the North II Group IV title and achieved second place in the Union County tournament.

“The tenacity this team demonstrated throughout the season simply is inspiring,” said Lesniak (D-Union). “The athletic accomplishments of these young men reflect their strong character, of which Elizabeth and all of Union County are proud.”

“The victories these young men garnered on the soccer field were the product of teamwork, perseverance and an undying commitment to excellence,” said Quijano (D-Union). “They represent both Elizabeth and Union County well, and I look forward to observing the bright future of every member of this team.”

“The Elizabeth Minutemen are great student athletes who strive to make their school and their community proud. They undoubtedly have achieved that goal,” said Holley (D-Union). “I commend all of the players, parents, coaches and fans whose dedication made this possible.”

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Tucker, Johnson, Holley & DeAngelo Legislation to Facilitate Relocation for Military Families Clears Panel

Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Cleopatra Tucker, Gordon Johnson, Jamel Holley and Wayne DeAngelo to help provide military families with more flexibility regarding the use of their housing allowance when they receive orders to relocate recently was advanced by an Assembly committee.

“Oftentimes service in the military requires members to relocate with little or no prior notice, which puts a great deal of stress on military families,” said Tucker (D-Essex). “By minimizing disruption to the lives of service members’ spouses and children, this legislation will ensure that members can balance their commitments to both the military and their families.”

The resolution (AR-134) would urge the president and Congress to enact the “Military Family Stability Act,” federal legislation that would allow military family members to move to a new location either six months before or after a service member’s permanent change of station report date. The sponsors noted that the measure would provide military spouses with more time to adjust career plans, if needed, and would limit the chances of a child having to transition to a new school in the middle of an academic year.

The federal bill would allow military family members to receive, for up to six months, a housing allowance based on their current location while the service member would receive housing compensation or be provided with temporary unaccompanied housing at the new location.

Military family members would be eligible for the housing allowance if:

  • the spouse is employed or enrolled in a degree, certificate or license program;
  • the service member and spouse have at least one child in school;
  • the spouse or child is covered under the Exceptional Family Member Program;
  • the service member or spouse is caring for an immediate family member with a chronic or long-term illness; or
  • the service member is undergoing a permanent change of station as an individual augmentee or other deployment arrangement.

“We all recognize the difficulties that members of our armed forces face, but we would be remiss to overlook the challenges their spouses and children also deal with,” said Johnson (D-Bergen). “Abrupt and frequent relocations can affect family members’ ability to hold down a job or finish school. Our state and our nation must take an active role in making these transitions easier for military families.”

“Giving military families more time to plan a move can help ensure that they can make the appropriate arrangements for school-age children or loved ones who may need special medical care, for example,” said Holley (D-Union). “This legislation is about providing some flexibility for the men and women who put their lives on the line for the sake of our nation.”

“The men and women who serve in America’s military love their families and their country above all else,” said DeAngelo (D-Mercer/Middlesex). “When they know that their loved ones are taken care of, they’re better able to devote themselves to military service. As such, this is, fundamentally, a means of advancing national security, which benefits all Americans.”

The legislation was advanced on Thursday by the Assembly Military and Veterans’ Affairs Committee, of which Tucker is chair and DeAngelo is vice-chair.

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Assembly Democratic Legislation to Expand Primary Voting Rights, Encourage Youth Participation in Elections Clears Committee

Bill Would Allow Certain 17-Year-Olds to Vote in Primaries

Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Andrew Zwicker, Jamel Holley, Elizabeth Muoio, Tim Eustace, Arthur Barclay, Angela McKnight and Raj Mukherji that would allow more young New Jersey residents to participate in elections was advanced by an Assembly committee on Monday.

The bill (A-3591), the “New Voter Empowerment Act,” would allow 17-year-olds to vote in a primary election provided they will turn 18 on or before the next succeeding general election.

“Young people in New Jersey are eager to raise their voices and make a difference,” said Zwicker (D-Hunterdon/Mercer/Middlesex/Somerset). “Barring voters who will be able to participate in a general election from taking part in the primary beforehand unjustifiably dampers that enthusiasm. We can’t have two categories of voters in our state. If you can vote in a general election, you should be eligible to vote in the primary.”

New Jersey would join 21 states and the District of Columbia in allowing 17-year-olds who will turn 18 during the interim period between a primary or caucus and the general election to participate in the nomination process, Zwicker noted.

“There’s a whole set of young people in New Jersey who want to – and should – fulfill their civic duty during the general election but are shut out of making their voices heard during the primary,” said Holley (D-Union). “Allowing 17-year-old New Jersey residents who ultimately will choose a candidate in the general election to vote in the primary will make the electoral process more fair.”

“Many states permit eligible 17-year-olds to vote, because they recognize that making voters choose a candidate they had no say in nominating is fundamentally undemocratic,” said Muoio (D-Mercer/Hunterdon). “All who can vote in a general election should be afforded the opportunity to engage in the primary, too.”

“As a matter of principle, all eligible voters should be able to take part in both the primary and the general election,” said Eustace (D-Bergen/Passaic). “This legislation will make that basic notion the law in New Jersey.”

“Those who turn 18 in between a primary and a general election are expected to participate in one part of the democratic process but are excluded from another very important part entirely,” said Barclay (D-Camden/Gloucester). “New Jersey must ensure that these young voters have a say in both June and November.”

“It’s important for our state to establish a culture of voting in both primaries and general elections among young people,” said McKnight (D-Hudson). “Making this simple change will enable thousands more first-time voters to get involved in elections.”

“Increasing voter turnout is integral to ensuring that all voices are heard and all people are represented in our democracy,” said Mukherji (D-Hudson). “If 17-year-olds are allowed to enlist and serve in the Armed Forces with parental consent or upon emancipation, then they should certainly be allowed to participate in selecting party nominees when they will turn 18 in time to vote for that nominee.”

The legislation was advanced by the Assembly Judiciary Committee.

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Tucker, Johnson, Holley & Downey Legislation to Increase Post-Traumatic Stress Awareness Gains Committee OK

Measure Would Make June 27 Annual ‘Post-Traumatic Stress Injury Awareness Day’

Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Cleopatra Tucker, Gordon Johnson, Jamel Holley and Joann Downey to raise awareness of post-traumatic stress injury, which affects millions of Americans, was advanced by an Assembly committee on Thursday.

“The combat-related post-traumatic stress America’s veterans experience often is misunderstood and stigmatized in a nation that owes its freedom to them,” said Tucker (D-Essex). “Raising post-traumatic stress awareness can help create a climate in which New Jersey’s veterans feel more comfortable seeking help if they need it.”

The joint resolution (AJR-91) would designate June 27 of each year as “Post-Traumatic Stress Injury Awareness Day.” The legislation aims to bring awareness to those suffering from post-traumatic stress injury and to encourage people to reach out to their fellow citizens to provide support and remove the associated stigma.

“Post-traumatic stress is more pronounced among those who have served in the military,” said Johnson (D-Bergen). “One of the most important ways in which we all can express our gratitude to them is by knowing the signs and helping them overcome barriers to treatment.”

“Many individuals who go through a traumatic experience then have to deal with reliving that experience every day, and they don’t know where to turn,” said Holley (D-Union). “This legislation is about equipping New Jersey residents with the tools they need to help family members, friends and neighbors who may be suffering.”

“It can be difficult for someone who hasn’t experienced post-traumatic stress to understand what a loved one is going through, even if it’s clear that something isn’t right,” said Downey (D-Monmouth). “Taking action to remove the stigma and encourage those who are suffering to seek proper and timely treatment can save lives.”

The measure was advanced by the Assembly Military and Veterans’ Affairs Committee, of which Tucker is chair.

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Tucker, Johnson, Holley & DeAngelo Measure to Help Ease Financial Burden for Families of Deceased Student Vets Advances

Resolution Urges Congress to Prevent IRS from Taxing Loan Forgiveness

Legislation Assembly Democrats Cleopatra Tucker, Gordon M. Johnson, Jamel Holley and Wayne DeAngelo sponsored to help ease the financial burden incurred by the family of a deceased student veteran was advanced by an Assembly committee on Thursday.

The resolution (AR-135) would urge Washington officials to enact the “Andrew P. Carpenter Tax Act,” federal legislation that would prevent the Internal Revenue Service from collecting taxes on any amount of a student loan forgiven for a deceased veteran.

“Taxing loan forgiveness can be burdensome to family members, especially during their period of grief over the loss of a loved one,” said Tucker (D-Essex). “This legislation is about making sure parents and any other parties who agreed to cosign on a loan for a student veteran do not experience additional suffering after the student’s death.”

Under the federal “Higher Education Act,” a service member who dies as a result of an injury or illness sustained while on active duty must have federal education loans forgiven. The amount of the forgiven loan is then considered taxable gross income for a cosigner by the IRS, however, and family members who agreed to cosign on the loan are held responsible for those taxes. The resolution would urge the president and Congress to prohibit this taxation.

“Families of deceased student veterans have sacrificed so much for this country. When their loved ones gave their lives for the United States of America, they, too, gave a part of themselves,” said Johnson (D-Bergen). “Considering that level of sacrifice, it’s only right for the federal government to take action on their behalf.”

“For parents with a son or daughter in the United States Armed Forces, that child’s death is their greatest fear,” said Holley (D-Union). “When that fear is realized and the federal government makes these parents pay taxes on a deceased student’s loan – especially when the loan itself has already been forgiven – it’s just unconscionable.”

“Our nation ought to honor every student veteran who makes the ultimate sacrifice for the sake of the freedom and democracy of the United States of America,” said DeAngelo (D-Mercer/Middlesex). “Part of paying homage to those students who took out loans is alleviating as much of the financial burden on their families as possible. With the simple reform to the tax code outlined in this federal legislation, our country can show its support for military families.”

The measure was advanced by the Assembly Military and Veterans’ Affairs Committee, of which Tucker is chair and DeAngelo is vice-chair.

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Pinkin, Conaway, Giblin, Holley, Danielsen, Mukherji & Wimberly Bill to Help Promote Compassionate End-of-Life Treatment Options Gains Assembly Panel Approval

Legislation Would Establish Statewide Palliative & Hospice Care Information & Education Program

An Assembly panel on Thursday unanimously approved legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Nancy Pinkin, Herb Conaway, Jr., M.D, Thomas Giblin, Jamel Holley, Joseph Danielsen, Raj Mukherji and Benjie Wimberly to help promote the benefits of palliative and hospice care to patients in New Jersey.

The bill (A-542) would establish the “Palliative Care and Hospice Care Consumer and Professional Information and Education Program” in the Department of Health (DOH) in order to ensure that comprehensive and accurate information and education about palliative care and hospice care are available to the public, to health care providers, and to health care facilities.

“Palliative care is an increasingly important part of treatment because it focuses care intensely on the needs of the patient and their family,” said Pinkin (D-Middlesex). “This bill will ensure that patients suffering from debilitating illnesses are aware of the benefits of this treatment path when it comes to easing their pain and suffering.”

“Palliative care optimizes a patient’s quality of life by anticipating, preventing, and treating suffering caused by serious illness,” said Conaway (D-Burlington). “It’s a compassionate approach to treatment that we should be promoting for the benefit of New Jersey families.”

“With palliative care, a patient often receives comprehensive pain and symptom management, as well as discussions on treatment options that are appropriate to the individual, such as hospice care,” said Giblin (D-Essex/Passaic). “It’s important that we promote these benefits.”

“Palliative care has become an increasingly important part of treatment because it often involves addressing physical, emotional, social, and spiritual needs,” said Holley (D-Union). “Equally important, it also helps ensure a patient’s autonomy and their access to information and choice.”

The bill will require every hospital, nursing home, extended care facility, ambulatory health care facility providing long-term care services, and rehabilitation facility licensed in the state to provide information about appropriate palliative care and hospice care services to patients and residents with a serious illness.

“Hospice care is comprehensive in nature because it coordinates care between a home setting, as well as with outpatient and inpatient services,” said Danielsen (D-Middlesex/Somerset). “Given the delicate nature of this end-of-life situation, it’s important that we provide patients and families with the resources necessary to cope.”

“Hospice care is critical in meeting the physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and other special needs that are experienced during the final stages of illness, dying, and bereavement,” said Mukherji (D-Hudson). “We need to ensure that more families are aware of this important option.”

“Through a medically directed interdisciplinary team, hospice care provides services to patients and their families,” said Wimberly (D-Bergen/Passaic). “This targeted type of care is critical to a patient’s overall well-being when dealing with life-threatening illnesses.”

Under the bill, the Commissioner of Health may require a facility that fails to comply with these requirements to provide a plan of action to bring the facility into compliance. In implementing these requirements, DOH would be required to take into account the size of the facility; access and proximity to palliative care and hospice care services, including the availability of hospice and palliative care board-certified practitioners and related workforce staff; geographic factors; and any other factors that may impact the ability of a hospital, nursing home, or facility to comply.

Additionally, the bill establishes the Palliative Care and Hospice Care Advisory Council within DOH. In collaboration with the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, the council would be charged with implementing the provisions of the bill, developing the information to be provided to patients and residents by hospitals, nursing homes, and other facilities and facilitating the provision of this information, and developing resources and programs to facilitate access to palliative care and hospice care services for patients and residents.

The council will be comprised of nine members, to be appointed as follows: one member of the Senate and two public members appointed by the Senate President; one member of the General Assembly and two public members appointed by the Assembly Speaker; and three public members appointed by the Governor. The public members should be individuals who have experience, training, or academic background in issues related to the provision of palliative care or hospice care.

The bill was approved by the Assembly Health and Senior Services Committee.

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