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Wimberly, Johnson, Spencer & Holley Bill to Promote Minority Recruitment in Law Enforcement Clears Assembly Committee

Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Benjie Wimberly, Gordon Johnson, Grace Spencer and Jamel Holley aimed at making law enforcement agencies in New Jersey more representative of the communities they serve was advanced by an Assembly panel on Monday.

The bill (A-1887) would require each state, county and local law enforcement agency in New Jersey to establish a minority recruitment and selection program. The programs would ensure that the agencies reflect the diversity of the populations they serve.

“When the makeup of the law enforcement population mirrors that of the general population in a community, people are more likely to have a sense that they can relate to and trust the police,” said Wimberly (D-Bergen/Passaic). “Diversity is important in all workplace environments, but it’s particularly significant when it comes to a profession that requires regular interaction with the community.”

As per the legislation, the programs would: set goals for recruiting and hiring minorities and women within a specified time frame, describe methods for evaluating whether these goals have been met and establish corrective action to be taken if goals are unmet.

“Effective policing requires the public’s trust in the law enforcement officers who protect them, and a big part of that lies in the general population feeling understood by the police,” said Johnson (D-Bergen), who formerly served as Bergen County sheriff. “Increasing minority and female representation in law enforcement agencies can help achieve that end. Furthermore, the reporting requirements included in this bill will increase transparency in hiring practices among departments.”

“A key element of an effective police force in a community is an ability to relate to the people in that community, whether that means being sensitive to their cultural backgrounds or being able to communicate in a language they understand,” said Spencer (D-Essex). “This measure is aimed at improving the relationship between the police and communities throughout our state.”

“In addition to making sure that police officers are properly trained and equipped to serve and protect the people, it’s important that we take action to ensure that the makeup of a department mirrors the community,” said Holley (D-Union). “With more members from different backgrounds, our police forces will have a greater variety of perspectives, which ultimately will make them more approachable to the public and improve overall public safety.”

Under the bill, county prosecutors would monitor programs established by county and municipal agencies, and the state attorney general would monitor programs established by the state police and other state law enforcement agencies. The attorney general would report annually to the governor and the legislature regarding the programs and also publish a summary of the report online.

The bill also would set annual reporting requirements concerning the overall diversity of law enforcement agencies. Each state, county and municipal agency would be required to report on the age, gender, race and ethnicity of: officers currently appointed to the law enforcement agency, officers promoted within the agency in the previous year, applicants appointed to the agency in the previous year and all applicants for a position with the agency in the previous year. Agencies also would be required to report the reasons for denying applicants an appointment.

The bill was advanced by the Assembly Law and Public Safety Committee.

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Singleton & Holley Bill to Encourage N.J. Colleges & Universities to Offer $10,000 Degree Programs Advanced by Assembly Panel

(TRENTON) – Legislation Assembly Democrats Troy Singleton and Jamel Holley sponsored to encourage New Jersey’s colleges and universities to offer baccalaureate degree programs that cost no more than $10,000 in tuition and fees was advanced Monday by an Assembly panel.
The bill (ACR-114) comes after a number of institutions of higher education in other states, including Texas and Florida, have taken measures to make attending college more affordable by developing $10,000 baccalaureate degree programs.
“The cost of attending an institution of higher education continues to increase, and many New Jersey students and their families find it difficult to afford the tuition and fees required for enrollment,” said Singleton (D-Burlington). “We’ve worked hard over the last several months to pass higher education reform bills, and this is another piece of that effort. A person’s level of education continues to be one of the most significant factors in determining his economic well-being. With many highly-skilled workers competing for a limited number of job openings, it’s imperative that high school graduates be able to afford to attend college and attain the skills necessary to compete in the 21st century workplace.”
“College tuition has increased at a rate faster than inflation for approximately 30 years, which has resulted in record-high student loan debt,” said Holley (D-Union). “Offering baccalaureate degree programs that cost no more than $10,000 in tuition and fees will greatly increase the ability of New Jersey students to attend an institution of higher education, acquire the training needed to secure good, high-paying jobs, minimize student loan debt and become productive members of their communities.”
The sponsors noted that, at approximately $1.2 trillion, total student loan debt has exceeded the total national credit card debt. That’s completely unacceptable.
“Higher education needs to be affordable and a gateway to a better future, not decades of financial struggle,” Singleton said.
“If we’re to help our hard-working families, we need to consider every alternative to creating an affordable higher education,’ Holley said.
According to a 2011 United States Census Bureau report, a person who graduates from college with a baccalaureate degree will earn, over the course of a lifetime, $2.4 million, which on average is $1 million more than a person with only a high school diploma.
Yet, in its ninth annual report on student loan debt issued in November of 2014 the Institute for College Access and Success found that nearly seven in 10 college seniors who graduated in 2013 left school with an average of $28,400 in student loan debt, an increase of 2 percent over 2012.
Also, according to the Office of the Secretary of Higher Education, for the 2014-15 academic year the average annual cost of tuition and fees for a full-time, in-state, undergraduate student enrolled in a four-year public institution of higher education is $12,894, and the average annual cost of tuition and fees for a full-time undergraduate student enrolled in an independent institution of higher education in New Jersey is $35,084.
The bill was released by the Assembly Higher Education Committee.

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Spencer, Sumter & Holley to Provide Alternative Education Programs for High Schoolers Battling Addiction Signed into Law

(TRENTON) – Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats L. Grace Spencer, Shavonda Sumter and Jamel Holley to create alternative education programs for high schools students who are recovering from substance abuse has been signed into law.
“A typical school setting may not be best option for students who are dealing with an addiction where they can easily fall back into old habits,” said Spencer (D-Essex). “Recovery high schools offer a safe and sober alternative where these students can focus on their studies and their recovery.”
“Breaking the chains of addiction can be very difficult,” said Sumter (D-Bergen/Passaic). “For many, recovery is a life-long journey. Putting these students in an environment that is free of temptation and that caters specifically to their dependency issues can help them stay on course.”
“Students battling addiction have a better chance of staying clean if they are in a setting that is conducive to that,” said Holley (D-Union). “If we want these students to be academically successful and have a chance at a good life, we must address their addiction struggles, as well as their education.”
The law (A-4878) authorizes a school district to establish alternative education programs, including recovery high school alternative education programs, upon the approval of the board of education. A recovery high school alternative education program is defined as an alternative education program that serves students diagnosed with substance use disorder or dependency as defined by the most recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, and that provides a comprehensive four-year high school education in an alternative public school setting and a structured plan of recovery that is aligned with the national framework of evidence-based practices for recovery high schools.
Under the provisions, a sending district may enter into an agreement with a school district that has established a recovery high school alternative education program for the provision of services to a student who is currently enrolled in the sending district. If the student is admitted to the recovery high school alternative education program, the sending district will pay tuition to that district.

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Spencer, Sumter & Holley to Provide Alternative Education Programs for High Schoolers Battling Addiction Clears Legislature

(TRENTON) — Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats L. Grace Spencer, Shavonda Sumter and Jamel Holley to create alternative education programs for high schools students who are recovering from substance abuse was approved 73-0 Monday by the Assembly, giving it final legislative approval.

“A typical school setting may not be best option for students who are dealing with an addiction where they can easily fall back into old habits,” said Spencer (D-Essex). “Recovery high schools offer a safe and sober alternative where these students can focus on their studies and their recovery.”

“Breaking the chains of addiction can be very difficult,” said Sumter (D-Bergen/Passaic). “For many, recovery is a life-long journey. Putting these students in an environment that is free of temptation and that caters specifically to their dependency issues can help them stay on course.”

“Students battling addiction have a better chance of staying clean if they are in a setting that is conducive to that,” said Holley (D-Union). “If we want these students to be academically successful and have a chance at a good life, we must address their addiction struggles, as well as their education.”

The bill (A-4878) authorizes a school district to establish alternative education programs, including recovery high school alternative education programs, upon the approval of the board of education. A recovery high school alternative education program is defined as an alternative education program that serves students diagnosed with substance use disorder or dependency as defined by the most recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, and that provides a comprehensive four-year high school education in an alternative public school setting and a structured plan of recovery that is aligned with the national framework of evidence-based practices for recovery high schools.

Under the bill’s provisions, a sending district may enter into an agreement with a school district that has established a recovery high school alternative education program for the provision of services to a student who is currently enrolled in the sending district. If the student is admitted to the recovery high school alternative education program, the sending district will pay tuition to that district.

The bill now goes to the governor.

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Green & Holley Bill to Help Residents Participating in Homeowner Assistance and Recovery Programs Heads to Gov’s Desk

Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Jerry Green and Jamel Holley to make it easier for not-for-profits to help families facing home foreclosure gained final legislative approval from the Assembly on Monday.

“The process can be streamlined for homeowners who have help from a church or another not-for-profit organization to save their homes from foreclosure,” said Green (D-Middlesex/Somerset/ Union). “In these cases, the transfer of ownership is temporary. The home will return to the ownership of someone who lives in the home.”

The intent of the bill (A-4687) is to exempt certain sales of residential property to a purchaser operating as a housing assistance and recovery program (HARP) form the payment of realty transfer fees. Under a HARP, a not-for-profit entity, such as a church organization, partners with a back to rescue homeowners in danger of foreclosure eviction. The not-for-profit entity works with the mortgage holder to purchase the property and then leases the property back to the original homeowner at an affordable rent.

“Too many New Jersey residents are seeking help to save their homes from foreclosure and more time to climb out of financial difficulty,” said Holley (D-Union). “If not-for-profit organizations are able to help homeowners facing foreclosure then they should be allowed to help. The state can help by easing a bit of the red tape involved in the process.”

The bill states the goal of HARP is to help financially strengthen the homeowner within a seven-year period, and then resell the property back to that homeowner, or member of the family living with the homeowner. The purpose of the sale or transfer to the HARP is to stop foreclosure or eviction proceedings; therefore, it does not make sense to charge a realty transfer fee because the property will be returned to the seller.

To discourage fraud, if the property is sold to someone other than the original seller, or a person residing with the seller, then an amount equal to twice the realty transfer fee would be collected at the time of that subsequent sale.

The bill, which passed both houses unanimously, now heads to the governor’s desk.

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Assembly Democratic Legislation to Document Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Deaths Becomes Law

Garcia, Lagana, Taliaferro, Vainieri Huttle, Danielsen, Holley, Benson & Jimenez Law Permits Illness to Be Cited as Secondary Cause of Death on Official Records

(TRENTON) – Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Carmelo G. Garcia, Joseph Lagana, Adam Taliaferro, Valerie Vainieri Huttle, Joe Danielsen, Jamel Holley, Daniel Benson and Angelica Jimenez to ensure that fatalities linked to Alzheimer’s disease are properly recorded in official records was signed into law on Monday.

The new law (A-4188) stipulates that Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders may be listed as a secondary cause of death on a certification of death. Often, the primary cause of death on a death certificate is identified as an acute condition, such as pneumonia or heart failure. Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders, however, cause a decline in brain function that may lead to problems with feeding and swallowing and can put an individual at risk for poor nutrition, dehydration and infection. This may significantly increase the risk of developing, and exacerbate the effects of, the acute condition that ultimately is listed as the primary cause of death on the person’s death certificate.

“Although recent research suggests that Alzheimer’s disease may be among the top three causes of death in the U.S., it’s difficult to substantiate that without citing Alzheimer’s on death certificates,” said Garcia (D-Hudson). “Having Alzheimer’s listed in addition to the immediate cause of death will help improve the accuracy of records and, hopefully, draw greater attention to an illness that impacts millions of Americans.”

Detaching Alzheimer’s disease from the immediate cause of death in official records undermines the reality that it is a grave illness that requires urgent action, Garcia noted. As such, under the new law, Alzheimer’s disease may be listed as a secondary cause of death, provided that: (1) the deceased person has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or a related disorder, and (2) it is determined, in accordance with accepted medical standards and with a reasonable degree of medical certainty, that Alzheimer’s disease or a related disorder was a significant contributing cause of the person’s death.

“Although data indicates that nearly 84,000 people died from Alzheimer’s and related disorders in 2010, studies suggest that the true number of deaths attributable to these conditions may be greater than 500,000,” said Lagana (D-Bergen/Passaic). “This discrepancy is due in part to the way deaths are recorded on death certificates. This law aims to create a more accurate picture to aid medical professionals.”

“It’s important that we gain a more accurate picture of the number of deaths caused by Alzheimer’s and related disorders, because it can have a significant impact on the way these illnesses are treated, how research is directed, and how funding for all of these things is allocated,” said Taliaferro (D-Cumberland/Gloucester/Salem).

“Having more accurate data available on the number of fatalities related to Alzheimer’s will lead to more awareness, more research and ultimately, a better overall understanding of this disease,” said Vainieri Huttle (D-Bergen). “Something as simple as putting ‘Alzheimer’s’ on death certificates has the potential to transform the way we see this illness.”

“Deaths related to Alzheimer’s disease often are underreported because another complication is listed as the sole cause of death,” said Danielsen (D-Middlesex/Somerset). “Particularly among older populations, there may be more than one illness that leads to death, and it’s important for official records to reflect that.”

“Properly recording how many individuals die due to Alzheimer’s disease is the first step toward having more funding allocated for research,” said Holley (D-Union). “Once we have data available that accurately lays out the impact of this illness, we will be better equipped to move toward a cure.”

“When studies suggest that the actual Alzheimer’s death toll is six times what’s been reported, it’s a signal that we have to change our approach to recordkeeping and data collection surrounding this illness,” said Benson (D-Mercer/Middlesex). “Citing Alzheimer’s disease as a secondary cause of death is a means of more accurately recording its prevalence and acknowledging its seriousness.”

“There is huge discrepancy between the number of deaths actually recorded from Alzheimer’s and related disorders and the real number believed to be attributable to these illnesses,” said Jimenez (D-Bergen/Hudson). “Given that it’s the only major cause of death that can’t be cured or prevented, we need to improve data in order to boost research.”

Nothing in the new law requires Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders to be listed as a secondary cause of death on a death certificate, and the law provides that no person shall be subject to criminal or civil liability or professional disciplinary action for listing or failing to list Alzheimer’s disease or a related disorder as a secondary cause of death on a certification of death.

The legislation received unanimous approval from both the Assembly and the Senate.

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Stender, Lampitt, Holley & Moriarty Bill to Help Inform Parents of Crib Safety Information Now Law

(TRENTON) – Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Linda Stender, Pamela Lampitt, Jamel Holley and Paul Moriarty to provide parents with information about crib safety has been signed into law.

“Many new parents may have the idea that a crib is a crib and that any crib will do,” said Stender (D-Middlesex/Somerset/Union). “This is just not the case. This law allows us to take advantage of an opportunity to educate new parents on crib safety. Providing this information underscores the importance of purchasing the right crib for your baby.”

The law (A-1355) requires the Department of Health to prepare and make available on its website information on crib safety, including, but not limited to, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission ban on traditional drop-side cribs and the dangers of using traditional drop-side cribs that may still be in existence.

As of June 28, 2011, all cribs manufactured and sold must comply with new federal safety standards. In light of several highly publicized incidents involving drop-side cribs, the CPSC published new rules that: prohibit the sale of drop-side cribs; require that a crib’s slats, mattress supports and hardware be more durable in their construction; and require manufacturers to submit cribs to more rigorous testing to show compliance with the new safety standards.

“The numerous crib recalls, re-sales and incidents which have occurred in recent years warrant legislative action,” said Lampitt (D-Camden/Burlington). “We must do more to educate new parents on safety. It will save our most precious of lives – newborn babies.”

“Parents unknowingly put their children at risk of being injured or dying if they don’t know how to use a crib properly,” said Holley (D-Union). “This law will help ensure that mothers and fathers are aware of the latest in crib safety when they take their babies home.”

“New parents have so much on their minds that they may not be able to keep up with the millions of cribs that have been recalled. Unbeknownst to them, the place where their newborn baby spends most of his or her time may be one of the most dangerous places in the home,” said Moriarty (D-Camden/Gloucester). “Providing parents with information on cribs can help prevent tragedies in New Jersey.”

Unsafe sleep environments can result in deaths due to entrapment, suffocation, and strangulation, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). For more information on crib safety, visit the AAP website.

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Mukherji, Holley & Gusciora Bill to Exempt Homeless from Fee for a Non-Driver Identification Card Now Law

Legislation Assembly Democrats Raj Mukherji, Jamel Holley and Reed Gusciora sponsored that would allow homeless people to obtain, duplicate or renew a non-driver identification card without paying fees to the Motor Vehicle Commission was signed into law on Monday.

“The administration fee is the only thing preventing many homeless people from acquiring identification, when shelters and social services organizations are willing to help these citizens,” said Mukherji (D-Hudson). “Identification will be useful in many ways by allowing them access to services that will help them in the long run. It is a simple, common-sense change in the law that can make a huge impact in the lives of our homeless citizens.”

“As we continue looking to combat the scourges of poverty in New Jersey, this is a simple step that can go a long way toward giving homeless people a step up,” said Holley (D-Union). “As we all know, it’s difficult to get a job and services without identification. We should make it as easy as possible for our most vulnerable residents to acquire it so they can more easily rebuild their lives.”

“We should remove any obstacles that prevent those living in poverty from improving their lives,” said Gusciora (D-Mercer/Hunterdon). “Waiving this fee will make it easier for a homeless person to get the identification they need to get a new start. It’s a simple but effective idea.”

Under the new law (A-2107), the MVC chief administrator may waive the fees for a homeless person who submits proof of temporary residence through either a social worker or the coordinator of an emergency shelter for the homeless where the person is temporarily residing.

Currently, residents who are 14 years of age and older may apply to the MVC for a non-driver identification card, for a fee of $24. The card is issued solely for the purpose of providing identification and is not a license to drive.

The new law will take effect in August.

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Vainieri Huttle, Holley & Downey Bill to Strengthen Protections for Victims of Sexual Assault Becomes Law

(TRENTON) – Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Valerie Vainieri Huttle, Jamel Holley and Joann Downey to strengthen protections for survivors of sexual assault was signed into law on Monday.

The new law (formerly bill A-4207) modifies the scope of the “Sexual Assault Survivor Protection Act of 2015,” as well as the enforcement of protective orders under the provisions of that act that help protect victims from offenders who committed actual or attempted nonconsensual sexual contact, sexual penetration, or lewdness.

Vainieri Huttle was the lead sponsor of the original law, which expanded the availability of restraining orders to a greater number of sexual assault survivors. Prior to that law, in order to pursue a protective order, a victim must have had a previous or existing domestic relationship with the offender, such as a spousal or dating relationship, or had to file a criminal complaint against the offender.

“This new law will augment the landmark Sexual Assault Survivors Act to make it work even better for victims, bringing them greater protection and peace of mind,” said Vainieri Huttle (D-Bergen). “These changes will help tighten the law and eliminate any vagueness that might stand in the way of helping a victim secure protection.”

Specifically, the new law will:

  • Require the Division of Child Protection and Permanency in the Department of Children and Families to investigate and possibly pursue legal action when allegations of misconduct against an unemancipated minor by a parent, guardian, or other person having care, custody and control of that minor child, are reported by another parent or guardian. The division could also petition the Superior Court for a protective order and other relief on behalf of the reporting parent or guardian and the unemancipated minor;
  • Recognize and provide for the enforcement of protective orders entered under the provisions of a substantially similar sexual assault protection statute under federal law or the laws of another state; and
  • Distinguish between indictable and non-indictable violations of protective orders and any such violation, whether representing an indictable or non-indictable offense, would be adjudicated in Superior Court.

“When it comes to sexual assault and its aftermath, we need to throw the full weight of the law and our legal protections behind victims,” Holley (D-Union). “No one should have to feel alone in this battle.”

“The trauma of sexual assault can have lasting emotional repercussions so we need to help assure victims that they will at least be safe from physical repercussions,” said Downey (D-Monmouth). “This new law will do just that.”

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Assembly Democratic Legislation to Document Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Deaths Heads to Gov’s Desk

Garcia, Lagana, Taliaferro, Vainieri Huttle, Danielsen, Holley, Benson & Jimenez Bill Would Permit Illness to Be Cited as Secondary Cause of Death on Official Records

Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Carmelo G. Garcia, Joseph Lagana, Adam Taliaferro, Valerie Vainieri Huttle, Joe Danielsen, Jamel Holley, Daniel Benson and Angelica Jimenez to ensure that fatalities linked to Alzheimer’s disease are properly recorded in official records now heads to the governor’s desk.

The bill (A-4188) stipulates that Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders may be listed as a secondary cause of death on a certification of death. Often, the primary cause of death on a death certificate is identified as an acute condition, such as pneumonia or heart failure. Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders, however, cause a decline in brain function that may lead to problems with feeding and swallowing and can put an individual at risk for poor nutrition, dehydration and infection. This may significantly increase the risk of developing, and exacerbate the effects of, the acute condition that ultimately is listed as the primary cause of death on the person’s death certificate.

“Although recent research suggests that Alzheimer’s disease may be among the top three causes of death in the U.S., it’s difficult to substantiate that without citing Alzheimer’s on death certificates,” said Garcia (D-Hudson). “Having Alzheimer’s listed in addition to the immediate cause of death will help improve the accuracy of records and, hopefully, draw greater attention to an illness that impacts millions of Americans.”

Detaching Alzheimer’s disease from the immediate cause of death in official records undermines the reality that it is a grave illness that requires urgent action, Garcia noted. As such, under the bill, Alzheimer’s disease may be listed as a secondary cause of death, provided that: (1) the deceased person has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or a related disorder, and (2) it is determined, in accordance with accepted medical standards and with a reasonable degree of medical certainty, that Alzheimer’s disease or a related disorder was a significant contributing cause of the person’s death.

“Although data indicates that nearly 84,000 people died from Alzheimer’s and related disorders in 2010, studies suggest that the true number of deaths attributable to these conditions may be greater than 500,000,” said Lagana (D-Bergen/Passaic). “This discrepancy is due in part to the way deaths are recorded on death certificates. This bill aims to create a more accurate picture to aid medical professionals.”

“It’s important that we gain a more accurate picture of the number of deaths caused by Alzheimer’s and related disorders, because it can have a significant impact on the way these illnesses are treated, how research is directed, and how funding for all of these things is allocated,” said Taliaferro (D-Cumberland/Gloucester/Salem).

“Having more accurate data available on the number of fatalities related to Alzheimer’s will lead to more awareness, more research and ultimately, a better overall understanding of this disease,” said Vainieri Huttle (D-Bergen). “Something as simple as putting ‘Alzheimer’s’ on death certificates has the potential to transform the way we see this illness.”

“Deaths related to Alzheimer’s disease often are underreported because another complication is listed as the sole cause of death,” said Danielsen (D-Middlesex/Somerset). “Particularly among older populations, there may be more than one illness that leads to death, and it’s important for official records to reflect that.”

“Properly recording how many individuals die due to Alzheimer’s disease is the first step toward having more funding allocated for research,” said Holley (D-Union). “Once we have data available that accurately lays out the impact of this illness, we will be better equipped to move toward a cure.”

“When studies suggest that the actual Alzheimer’s death toll is six times what’s been reported, it’s a signal that we have to change our approach to recordkeeping and data collection surrounding this illness,” said Benson (D-Mercer/Middlesex). “Citing Alzheimer’s disease as a secondary cause of death is a means of more accurately recording its prevalence and acknowledging its seriousness.”

“There is huge discrepancy between the number of deaths actually recorded from Alzheimer’s and related disorders and the real number believed to be attributable to these illnesses,” said Jimenez (D-Bergen/Hudson). “Given that it’s the only major cause of death that can’t be cured or prevented, we need to improve data in order to boost research.”

Nothing in the bill would require Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders to be listed as a secondary cause of death on a death certificate, and the bill provides that no person shall be subject to criminal or civil liability or professional disciplinary action for listing or failing to list Alzheimer’s disease or a related disorder as a secondary cause of death on a certification of death.

The bill received unanimous approval from both the Assembly and the Senate.

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